The six lessons from Australia's Federal Election advertising campaigns

The six lessons from Australia's Federal Election advertising campaigns

There were six fundamental lessons for marketers and business leaders coming out of the political parties’ advertising campaigns for last month’s federal election.

The first was a reminder that memorable headlines and taglines work. None of the major parties’ ad campaigns in 2010, 2013 and 2016 had resonated with voters like “Kevin 07” had. But “the Bill you can’t afford” did. It had arisen as a standout line in a Liberal Party ad 11 months before the election. And when the Liberal strategists continued to hear voters discuss the line without being prompted, they quickly shifted their advertising emphasis to it rather than the more straightforward and less memorable “Building our economy. Securing our future”.

Andrew Baxter interviewed on The Future This Week podcast

Andrew Baxter interviewed on The Future This Week podcast

Andrew Baxter was interviewed on the University of Sydney Business School’s weekly podcast, The Future This Week, joining hosts Sandra Peter (Sydney Business Insights) and Kai Riemer (Digital Disruption Research Group).

In this episode, the discussion was around Apple’s privacy push that cuts out marketers, marketing to the algorithm, and robot furniture.

After a decade of success stories, has the tourism industry become over reliant on social media?

After a decade of success stories, has the tourism industry become over reliant on social media?

There has been a strong swing toward social media as the primary marketing channel for many tourism and travel brands over the last decade. Not just for those with larger budgets such as the airlines, hotels and tourism bodies, but particularly for smaller destinations and operators including many of Australia’s local indigenous tourism businesses whose marketing budgets can’t compete with the bigger players. This has been because social media in its earliest incarnation required a comparatively smaller investment in marketing.

The question now for many boards and CEOs is whether this heavy reliance on social media is the optimal use of their marketing budgets, particularly now that many of these social media channels are being strongly commercialised and are coming under increasing scrutiny around how they are managing the data they hold.

Marketers clamour to work on challenger brands, meaning the fundamental skills for managing leadership brands are slowly being forgotten

Marketers clamour to work on challenger brands, meaning the fundamental skills for managing leadership brands are slowly being forgotten

A generation ago marketers wanted to work only on leadership brands. There was an inherent pride in working with and learning from the best, from the market leader. Marketing graduates fought to be placed at Gillette, Colgate, Foster’s, McDonald’s, Nike and Coca-Cola. And there was a strong set of tried and true marketing strategies and tactics to manage leadership brands.

But today’s generation of marketers has clamoured to work on challenger brands following the success of companies such as Virgin, Red Bull and Aldi. And it’s been to the detriment of true leadership brands; those fundamental skills required for managing leadership brands have slowly been forgotten as the focus has shifted to the skills required for managing challenger brands.

In the rush to one to one marketing, the power of meaningful segmentation is being under utilised

In the rush to one to one marketing, the power of meaningful segmentation is being under utilised

Somewhere between one-to-one marketing and mass marketing, there’s a strategy which is slowly being lost. It’s the ability of marketers to segment and then target large groups of influential people with their product or service. Not the simplistic, default categories like millennials, grocery buyers, mums, primary cooks and over-50s. But groups that marketers understand even a little more deeply. Because first-time mums, cooking avoiders and active holidaymaking older couples conjure up far more interesting segments to target. And it’s these sorts of groups that are fast becoming marketing’s forgotten tribes.