The Sponsorship Dilemma: Brands are wary of some they sponsor, and those being sponsored are wary of some brands

The Sponsorship Dilemma: Brands are wary of some they sponsor, and those being sponsored are wary of some brands

There’s been a dual dilemma facing marketers in the sports sponsorship area over the past decade. Brands have become wary of sports stars, clubs or leagues who’ve found themselves in controversy — whether that be failed drug tests, drink driving, polarising points of view, betting and salary cap scandals, or other on-field or off-field issues.

Conversely, some sports stars, clubs or leagues have become more wary of the brands and companies they associate with, as increased scrutiny abounds over those companies’ corporate social responsibility efforts, or the categories they operate in become less socially acceptable.

Marketing to our million plus Australian Chinese consumers

Marketing to our million plus Australian Chinese consumers

Marketing to audiences of a million or more Australians has long been the ambition of many brands. Whether it’s our ice cream makers targeting the 10 million Australians who buy a tub at least once a year, or a youth brand targeting our 5 million Gen Zs, or a brand seeking to align itself with the Sydney Swans’ 1.2 million fans or The Block’s 1 million viewers, there’s something very appealing about marketing to an audience of 1 million-plus.

And marketers can now add Australian Chinese to that list.

The influencer strikes back

The influencer strikes back

One of the oldest adages in marketing is that word of mouth is the most effective way of communicating with your customers. Everyone can recall asking a good friend or a family member for a recommendation on a product or service they’re thinking of buying: a car; a washing machine; a holiday; a pair of shoes; someone to do your tax. A study by Nielsen earlier this decade found 92 per cent of people believed in word-of-mouth recommendations above all other forms of advertising.

Marketers have long tried to find ways to have these advocates tell more of their friends about their brand. Social media offered a new weapon to do this. Suddenly there were brand advocates on social media with thousands, tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of consumers following them. And the consumers had chosen to follow them because they liked the images and comments they were posting. They were interested in what they had to say and almost two-thirds of them believed what they were saying about brands.

With 25 per cent of Australian searches now being done via voice, the search battlefield is shifting from typing to talking

With 25 per cent of Australian searches now being done via voice, the search battlefield is shifting from typing to talking

For almost two decades, marketers have been trying to win the online search battle on a daily basis. That’s search in terms of consumers typing a request into Google, Safari or Bing, with marketers pouncing on that search to head them towards their product or service, instead of towards their competitors. The aim has been to have your brand on the first page of search results served up to a consumer, or even better still to be in the top three.

But with 25 per cent of Australian searches now being done via voice — through Google, Siri, Cortana and Alexa, et al — the search battlefield is shifting from typing to talking.

The six lessons from Australia's Federal Election advertising campaigns

The six lessons from Australia's Federal Election advertising campaigns

There were six fundamental lessons for marketers and business leaders coming out of the political parties’ advertising campaigns for last month’s federal election.

The first was a reminder that memorable headlines and taglines work. None of the major parties’ ad campaigns in 2010, 2013 and 2016 had resonated with voters like “Kevin 07” had. But “the Bill you can’t afford” did. It had arisen as a standout line in a Liberal Party ad 11 months before the election. And when the Liberal strategists continued to hear voters discuss the line without being prompted, they quickly shifted their advertising emphasis to it rather than the more straightforward and less memorable “Building our economy. Securing our future”.